Research In The News

Artifacts reveal history of family planning

Artifacts reveal history of family planning

Published Apr 23, 2018

The archaeological discovery of presumably aborted fetuses in New York outhouses along with pill bottles and historical records led Binghamton University researchers to conclude that many 19th century American women had family-planning concerns similar to those of 21st century women, Forbes reports. Read more

‘Fundamentalist U’

‘Fundamentalist U’

Published Mar 16, 2018

Binghamton researcher Adam Laats discusses his new book on evangelical higher education with Inside Higher Ed. Read more

Scientists find fossil from oldest modern human out of Africa

Scientists find fossil from oldest modern human out of Africa

Published Jan 26, 2018

“The dating had to be rock solid,” Binghamton anthropologist Rolf M. Quam told The New York Times. The team dated the tooth dentin and enamel, the sediment stuck to the upper jaw, and tools found near the fossil. Read more

‘The Weeping Time’ auction destroyed families

‘The Weeping Time’ auction destroyed families

Published Jan 4, 2018

Binghamton historian Anne C. Bailey’s new book describes how a slave auction wrenched families apart, the Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel reports. Read more

Bio-battery could be powered by your sweaty gym socks

Bio-battery could be powered by your sweaty gym socks

Published Dec 11, 2017

A stretchy, flexible battery developed at Binghamton University could be powered by your sweat, Newsweek reports.  Read more

Most men confuse sexual interest with consent, a new paper shows

Most men confuse sexual interest with consent, a new paper shows

Published Nov 30, 2017

What constitutes consent is apparently still unclear to most men. According to a new paper from Binghamton University and Rush University, most men confused sexual interest with consent, Teen Vogue reports. Read more

‘Textisms’ help get meaning across in digital era

‘Textisms’ help get meaning across in digital era

Published Nov 20, 2017

It turns out that punctuation is quite effective at conveying emotion when we can’t be face to face, Newsweek reports, citing a study by Binghamton psychologist Celia Klin. Read more