Research In The News

More than ‘Squid Game:’ the international rise of K-dramas

More than ‘Squid Game:’ the international rise of K-dramas

Published Oct 21, 2021

Binghamton University scholar Robert Ku and others discuss Korean dramas such as “Squid Game” on the radio program 1A this week. Read more

Christian schools boom in a revolt against curriculum, pandemic rules

Christian schools boom in a revolt against curriculum, pandemic rules

Published Oct 21, 2021

A boom in conservative Christian schooling appears to be driven nationwide by a combination of pandemic frustrations and rising parental anxieties around how schools handle education on issues including race and the rights of transgender students, the New York Times reports, quoting Binghamton historian Adam Laats and others. Read more

Why we share stories of local ghosts

Why we share stories of local ghosts

Published Oct 21, 2021

Communities have always circulated tales of nearby spirits that are attached to specific spaces and carry memorable lessons, Binghamton scholar Elizabeth Tucker and other folklorists tell Discover Magazine. Read more

Can skeletons have a racial identity?

Can skeletons have a racial identity?

Published Oct 19, 2021

In recent years, a growing number of forensic anthropologists, including Binghamton scholar Liz DiGangi, have grown critical of ancestry estimation and want to replace it with something more nuanced, The New York Times reports.  Read more

How to use science to focus at work

How to use science to focus at work

Published Sep 10, 2021

Quit kidding yourself that you can multitask, Binghamton psychologist Nicholas Gaspelin tells Wired. Read more

How school boards became battlegrounds for culture wars

How school boards became battlegrounds for culture wars

Published Aug 26, 2021

“The history of school board politics is a great way to chart the career of all culture war issues,” Binghamton historian Adam Laats tells The Guardian. “School boards made perfect battlefields.” Read more

New Asian American bakeries find bicultural sweet spot

New Asian American bakeries find bicultural sweet spot

Published Aug 26, 2021

Traditional Asian bakeries started out as a means of replicating something immigrants missed from their home country. The new bakeries’ bolder assertion of identity is a natural evolution, Binghamton scholar Robert Ji-Song Ku tells The Washington Post. Read more