Research In The News

Don’t crush that ant — it could plant a wildflower

Don’t crush that ant — it could plant a wildflower

Published Aug 13, 2020

Researchers, including Binghamton biologist Kirsten Prior, discussed the ant-seed relationship at the annual meeting of the Ecological Society of America, Science magazine reports. Read more

What should replace disputed memorials?

What should replace disputed memorials?

Published Aug 4, 2020

Confederate monuments and other disputed memorials have come down in cities across America. What should take their place? Binghamton historian Anne C. Bailey and others share their views with TIME magazine. Read more

What drives social behavior during the pandemic?

What drives social behavior during the pandemic?

Published Aug 4, 2020

NPR speaks with Binghamton University economist Plamen Nikolov about how the pandemic is altering the way we behave. Read more

Ending the pandemic will require big pharma to put ethics before profits

Ending the pandemic will require big pharma to put ethics before profits

Published Jul 20, 2020

Access to medicines is usually an ethical problem, not a scientific one, Binghamton scholar Nicole Hassoun writes in FastCompany. And that’s going to complicate the global coronavirus fight. Read more

Democrats are asking the wrong questions to protect charter school students

Democrats are asking the wrong questions to protect charter school students

Published Feb 28, 2020

To assess charter schools, we need to focus on teacher compensation and how students are treated, Binghamton historian Adam Laats writes in The Washington Post. Read more

The ‘manosphere’ is getting more toxic

The ‘manosphere’ is getting more toxic

Published Feb 17, 2020

Men from the less extreme end of the misogynistic spectrum are drifting toward groups that espouse violence against women, according to a new Binghamton University study highlighted in MIT Technology Review.  Read more

They sold human beings here

They sold human beings here

Published Feb 13, 2020

For hundreds of years, enslaved people were bought and sold in America. Today most of the sites of this trade are forgotten, Binghamton historian Anne C. Bailey writes in The New York Times. Read more