Research In The News

Democrats are asking the wrong questions to protect charter school students

Democrats are asking the wrong questions to protect charter school students

Published Feb 28, 2020

To assess charter schools, we need to focus on teacher compensation and how students are treated, Binghamton historian Adam Laats writes in The Washington Post. Read more

The ‘manosphere’ is getting more toxic

The ‘manosphere’ is getting more toxic

Published Feb 17, 2020

Men from the less extreme end of the misogynistic spectrum are drifting toward groups that espouse violence against women, according to a new Binghamton University study highlighted in MIT Technology Review.  Read more

They sold human beings here

They sold human beings here

Published Feb 13, 2020

For hundreds of years, enslaved people were bought and sold in America. Today most of the sites of this trade are forgotten, Binghamton historian Anne C. Bailey writes in The New York Times. Read more

The drones that track down buried warheads

The drones that track down buried warheads

Published Jan 13, 2020

This new Binghamton University technology can quickly detect unexploded ordnance after an armed conflict, Popular Mechanics reports. Read more

The case for historians being more engaged in public affairs

The case for historians being more engaged in public affairs

Published Dec 31, 2019

Binghamton University scholar Adam Laats writes in the Washington Post that historians “must move aggressively — not just exhort Americans to study the past, but help the public to dismantle historical interpretations that have been bent and twisted the past to support short-term political convenience.” Read more

Nobel prize honors breakthroughs on lithium-ion batteries

Nobel prize honors breakthroughs on lithium-ion batteries

Published Oct 11, 2019

If you’re reading this on a cellphone or laptop computer, you might thank the three winners of this year’s Nobel Prize in chemistry for their work on lithium-ion batteries, The New York Times reports.  Read more

Why is the U.S. still using hypnosis to convict criminals?

Why is the U.S. still using hypnosis to convict criminals?

Published Oct 7, 2019

For decades, U.S. law enforcement has used “forensic hypnosis” to help solve crimes – yet despite growing evidence that it is junk science, this method is still being used to send people to death row. The Guardian talks to Binghamton expert Steven Lynn and others about the controversial technique. Read more